DSC00555YS11

DSC00555YS11

DSC00527YSdraft

DSC00527YSdraft

DSC00536YS11

DSC00536YS11

In this series, each sculpture represents a life size animal, which species is being severely harmed by different types of human activity. The immaculate white stands for purity and the fragility of their endangered lives. The life size aspect is to give the onlooker an accurate idea of what these animals look like and raise awareness. The magnetised origamis, sitting on the sculpture like butterflies, stand for the ephemeral aspect of these creatures, and are made from recycled paper to support the correlation and causality between environmental concerns and animal endangerment. 

The decision of leaving the sculptures pure white is a result of the influence of Japanese traditional art "nihonga", in which artists used to leave a part of the canvas empty for the onlooker to be able to project his own thoughts on to the blank space - it was considered to be a mirror of the soul. The symmetry of the design was inspired by ancient Egyptian fresco art, in which characters would be represented in profile, giving the figures a very particular, geometrical and surreal aspect. The idea of playing with animal sculptures sparked thanks to a Tokyo exhibition focusing on Neo-nihonga back in 2009, which showcased an installation of artist Tomoko Konoike consisting of a wolf made of mirrors.

The overall Japanese background of the concept led to the idea of using origamis, to signify something as light and fragile as a butterfly or a sparrow, and to complete the whiteness of the sculptures, the paper cranes' colours correspond to the authentic colours of the animals being represented. Throughout the series, no other origami design than cranes is being displayed, due to their resemblance to butterflies and in order to bring a sort of homogeneity to the series. Like angels, the origamis come to the aid of these endangered species by bringing back their colours and lending them strength.