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Copyright Vethan Sautour Fernandina Giant Tortoise 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour Fernandina Giant Tortoise 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour Zanzibar Leopard 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour Zanzibar Leopard 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - Albany Adder I 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - Albany Adder I 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - Albany Adder II 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - Albany Adder II 2000px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - New Guinea Singing Dog 2000 px

Copyright Vethan Sautour - New Guinea Singing Dog 2000 px

Victorian Earless Dragon

Victorian Earless Dragon

Uganda African Painted Dog

Uganda African Painted Dog

Whilst in ’Origami Extinction’, the artist focused on aesthetics to create a potent effect on the audience, in ‘Origami Renaissance’, she decided to take it a step further in exploring the materiality behind the artwork and its symbolism. Thus, she decided to invite fire, a destructive element comparable to humanity’s fatal capabilities, to illustrate the magnitude and speed of our destruction of animal species.

The artist captured the makings of fire, the transformative aspect of its nature and the ever-changing shapes taken by the burnt materials. Taking multiple or single photographs of these rapidly vanishing moments, the artist bears witness to the power and beauty that emerges from what enabled humans to become the dominant species – a combined symbolic representation of two living organisms with a tremendous ability for annihilation.

Fire is one of the natural disasters that have been increasing in recent years, causing immense ravages to human activities and wild fauna alike. Each element in the pictures has been in contact with fire, but just as much as the latter stands for utter destruction it also emblematises the concept of renaissance, like the phoenix resurrecting from its ashes. Thereupon, ‘Origami Renaissance’ concentrates on animal species, which were thought to have disappeared and have been rediscovered.

Only one kind of origami has been used, the dove, the emblem of peace and hope. All photographs are numbered and limited to six editions.

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