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As time passes, the memory of those who are gone begin to fade. Their  face, voice, smell, laugh become blurry, even despite the advent of technology, which enabled the creation of voice recorders, cameras and video cameras. In this series, the phenomenon of fading memories is interpreted through pixelation. 


The degree of pixelation varies depending on the bond that united the deceased individual to the artist: the more pixelated the picture appears, the weaker the relationship between the two people was, the less pixelated it is, the stronger the bond was. In order to give a wide range of examples different kinds of relationships were selected: father, friend, grand-father, best friend.
 

The onlooker partakes in the experience, as his eyes try to make out what the pixelated photographed memory used to be, just as  much as the artist to whom the memory belongs. Symbolically, the artist and the onlooker share the same amount of visual information, although it is originally not the spectator's.